Newtown parent won't view NBC interview of Alex Jones

Connecticut's NBC affiliate, WVIT, broke with the network last night by refusing to run Megyn Kelly's interview with Alex Jones, the conspiracy theorist who claimed the 2012 Sandy Hook massacre was a staged event created to promote tougher gun control laws.

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — The publicity and uproar in the days before Sunday's broadcast of Megyn Kelly's interview with conspiracy theorist Alex Jones didn't translate into ratings.

Audio of the interview leaked prior to the telecast when Jones posted it online in an effort to discredit Kelly's line of questioning. Kelly was to be the host of a gala to benefit the Sandy Hook Promise Foundation, but was uninvited after news of the segment began to spread.

Kelly's first episode came out high, averaging 6.2 million viewers, while her second episode dipped down to 3.6 million viewers and was dwarfed by competitor 60 Minutes.

Yesterday's episode averaged 3.5 million viewers, a 0.5 rating among adults 18-49 and a 0.7 rating among adults 25-54, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

The interview prompted indignation, especially in CT, where 20 children and six adults were killed by a gunman at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown in 2012.

Kelly, now with NBC, told A.P. she respected Sandy Hook Promise's decision to drop her from a Wednesday event in Washington, but was disappointed.

Shortly before the interview, which was aired on Father's Day, Jones released a video in which he offered condolences to families who had lost children in the "horrible tragedy" of Newtown, but did not refer to his previous comments disputing the killings. The station was the only NBC affiliate that would not give airtime to the program, which devoted a 15-minute segment of its one-hour running time to Jones.

One Newtown parent did appear on Kelly's program: Neil Heslin, whose 6-year-old son, Jesse Lewis, was killed.

Relatives of the shooting victims have called Jones' comments hurtful and say he has encouraged people to harass them. The woman said she informed her belief that Sandy Hook was fake by reports by Jones' InfoWars and other similar publications.

  • Kyle Peterson