May to meet DUP leader to secure minority government deal

Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the opposition Labour Party, which saw its number of parliamentary seats and share of the vote increase, said there could be another election this year or early in 2018 after Thursday's vote produced no clear victor.

"The mood is very much that there will not be a leadership contest" one MP said.

After deciding to stay on as British PM despite the disastrous election results, Theresa May on Monday unveiled a largely unchanged new cabinet, which met for the first time in the day.

UK Prime Minister Theresa May has acknowledged her fault for the Conservative Party's dismal performance in the June 8 general election, apologizing to the MPs for the "mess" she created.

"I hope that together we will continue to build on the progress that we have made in previous Parliaments to fight against discrimination in all its forms, and make our politics more representative of the people we serve".

The leader of Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) says talks with the UK Prime Minister Theresa May to support a new government are going well.

May will host Arlene Foster in Downing Street to discuss terms of the DUP's backing for her minority government, reports the BBC.

Mrs Foster arrived with colleague Nigel Dodds and waved to reporters in Downing Street but refused to be drawn on whether she would agree to a deal on Tuesday.

They campaigned for Brexit despite the fact that Northern Ireland has the most to lose if there is no amicable deal with the EU. "And that worries me a great deal about the peace process".

Meanwhile, the Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson has said the priority of Brexit talks should be the economy and free trade and that other parties should be involved in negotiations.

Meanwhile, the chief European Union negotiator has told the Financial Times that the clock is ticking on Brexit talks, and that Britain should be wary of further delays.

The talks with the DUP follow her apology to Conservative rank-and-file lawmakers in a meeting for the party's poor election result.

Brexit will likely be on the agenda at the Paris meeting, after May confirmed she will stick to the negotiating timetable.

But "being seen to be the prime minister" could help "shore up her authority at home", according to Colin Talbot, professor of government at the University of Manchester.

The prime minister's spokesperson on Monday said, "Our position is clearly set out, it is clearly set out in a number of places and there has been no change to that". In Clegg's words, this has been a "topsy turvy" election: Labour under Jeremy Corbyn, the man who "could not win", has pulled off a kind of victory while still failing to become the largest party.

DUP leaders, Arlene Foster and Nigel Dodds, are now in the Westminister to discuss the possibility of post election ties. "We know those talks are going well and also we know that, at this very important time, we want to produce a substantial Queen's Speech".

"I find it incredibly self indulgent for the Tory party to be going for this sort of stuff", he said on ITV television.

The party, led by Arlene Foster, has blocked same-sex marriage in Northern Ireland and counts openly homophobic ministers among its ranks.

Defense Secretary Michael Fallon said the government was not looking at a formal coalition but would seek assurances that the DUP would vote with May "on the big things".

The DUP is also far more socially conservative than the Conservatives.

"Bringing stability to the United Kingdom government in and around issues around Brexit, obviously around counter-terrorism, and then doing what's right for Northern Ireland in respect of economic matters".

The Democratic Unionist Party controls the Northern Irish Assembly.

  • Rogelio Becker