Simple new blood test could identify genes linked to breast cancer risk

The researchers examined genetic data, including blood samples, from a combined 275,000 women, 146,000 of whom had been diagnosed with breast cancer.

He says he's spent those years spreading awareness and raising money for male breast cancer research.

This important discovery will help to determine with greater accuracy the risk of a woman developing breast cancer during her lifetime. The inherited component of breast cancer risk is due to a combination of rare variants in genes such as BRCA1 and BRCA2 that confer a high risk of the disease, and many commoner genetic variants that each confer only a small risk.

The new studies, published in the journals Nature and Nature Genetics, underscored the fact that the two cancer types are biologically distinct and develop differently. ". I'm prayerful and hopeful for a day we can find a cure for this particular cancer".

How much can the newly identified genes predict about breast cancer risk?

By analysing the 180 regions of the genome where are located some of the variations that predispose to breast cancer, it will be possible to determine the risk of a woman developing this cancer.

According to the National Cancer Institute, the risk of a man getting breast cancer is about 1 in 1,000 compared to a woman's risk.

Cancer patients who opt for alternative medicines over conventional treatment are two-and-a-half times more likely to die within five years of diagnosis, research revealed in August.

Lifestyle changes such as diet, body weight, exercise and alcohol consumption are some of the modifiable risk factors for this disease.

"We get grant funding through pharmaceutical companies and donations like the New Brunswick Fire Department", said Dorothy Reed, president and co-founder of the Sisters Network "It's hard economic times for everyone so when somebody just gives you a donation it's really a blessing".

A further seven genes were identified specifically in association with breast cancers that lacked oestrogen receptors, which don't tend to respond to hormone based therapies. However, we have developed a mathematical algorithm that incorporates the effect of each of the variations worn by a woman and which calculates from this the probability of her developing breast cancer, " says Simard, who sees in this new tool a way to identify women without a family history of breast cancer or ovarian cancer, but who are at high risk of suffering from such a cancer.

Baroness Delyth Morgan, chief executive of the charity Breast Cancer Now, said: 'This is another exciting step forward in our understanding of the genetic causes of breast cancer.

  • Santos West