Disneyland shuts down 2 cooling towers after guests contract Legionnaires' disease

Of the 12 cases of Legionnaire's disease that emerged in September, nine were among people who visited Disneyland in September.

The victims were aged between 52 and 94. One person, who had not visited Disneyland, died from the disease.

Disney shut down the two water cooling towers after officials detected high levels of the bacteria from the virus, according to reports.

Disneyland was informed of the Anaheim cases on October 27 and after testing found that two cooling towers had elevated levels of Legionella bacteria.

Nine people contracted Legionnaires' disease after visiting Disneyland in September, a Disneyland spokesperson confirmed Saturday.

The outbreak was traced to the convention hotel's air conditioning system, and Legionnaire's disease has since been sourced to contaminated water or mist.

The health agency told The AP that no new cases have been reported. The towers were taken out of service November 1, disinfected, went back in operation on November 5 but were shut down again Tuesday and will remain offline until tests confirm they are free from contamination, according to the park and the county health agency. "We conducted a review and learned that two cooling towers had elevated levels of Legionella bacteria", Dr. Pamela Hymel, chief medical officer for Walt Disney Parks and Resorts, said in a statement Friday, the Los Angeles Times reported. "We have proactively shared this information with OCHCA and given our actions, they have indicated there is no longer any known risk associated with our facilities".

The towers traced to the outbreak were located near the New Orleans Square Train Station, both towers more than 100 feet from public areas. The towers were chemically treated to combat the problem, and there is no ongoing threat to guests' health, the Register reports. It is treated with antibiotics and hospital care, but one in 10 of those who contract the disease dies from infection. It brought the towers back into service November 5, but two days later, they were taken out of service again, she said.

  • Santos West