$88 Billion Needed to Rebuild Post-ISIS Iraq

Iraq needs almost $90 billion to rebuild after three years of war with the Islamic State group, officials said Monday, with large parts of the country in ruins and tens of thousands left homeless.

The Kuwait conference's second day will be devoted to the private sector's role in rebuilding Iraq, with more than 2,000 companies and businessmen due to attend, according to the Gulf country. Officials from more than 70 countries and worldwide organizations are taking part in the 3-day meeting.

He said funds are urgently needed to "restore basic and infrastructure services" in many provinces. Iraq declared victory over Islamic State in December, after three years of the militant group waging war in large parts of Iraq and Syria.

According to the ministry official website, the spokesman underlined that Iran has had no hesitation in supporting the nation and government of Iraq as it has always stood by them in fight against terrorism and will continue to do so in the future.

United States officials have already said there will be no new pledges of assistance for Iraq's reconstruction drive, after Washington pumped some $60 billion into rebuilding the country following the US-led invasion toppled Saddam Hussein in 2003.

Kuwait's state news agency, KUNA, reported a pledge of providing Iraq with $330 million in humanitarian aid by non-governmental organizations at a parallel NGO conference.

A boy holds onto his mother as a Iraqi special forces armored vehicles drive by, during fighting with Islamic state militants in western Mosul, Iraq, Tuesday, March 14, 2017.

It must renew its embrace of the rule of law, as well as provide answers to families whose loved ones went missing in the war, said Katharina Ritz, the head of the delegation in Iraq for the International Committee of the Red Cross.

Analysts said Iraqi leaders are expected to pressure Saudi Arabia and other Gulf Arab states to step up to the plate.

Clean-up crews in Mosul, Iraq, after the city was recaptured from the Islamic State in July a year ago. It was at war with Iran for most of the 1980s, and its invasion of Kuwait in 1990 led to war with a US -led coalition and more than a decade of worldwide sanctions.

A USA -led invasion toppled Saddam Hussein and was followed by years of insurgency, sectarian bloodletting between Sunnis and Shi'ites, as well as ethnic tensions between the Arabs and Kurds, all before ISIL emerged in 2014.

  • Rogelio Becker