Facebook alerts 14M to privacy bug that changed status composer to public

Facebook alerts 14M to privacy bug that changed status composer to public

IT

Until Facebook and other companies improve their approach to privacy and develop settings that are easier to use and more aligned with what users want, "people should probably refrain from sharing too much sensitive information with these platforms", Mr. Sadeh said.

On Thursday, Facebook revealed that once again they messed with users' privacy while testing a new feature between May 18 and May 27. These items are visible to the public, however, the company extended that setting to all the new posts, TechCrunch reports.

The glitch set a user's post to be shared to "everyone", even if a user had previously chosen a more restricted option, such as "friends of friends".

It is still unclear how numerous 14 million profiles that were affected may have posted content privately without realizing they were sharing publicly.

A statement attributed to Facebook chief privacy officer Erin Egan read, "we recently found a bug that automatically suggested posting publicly when some people were creating their Facebook posts".

Facebook said it will reach out to the users who are thought to have been affected by the bug.

Considering that Facebook has almost 2.2 billion users worldwide, the number of affected users is small. "We'd like to apologize for this mistake".

A message will prompt them to "Please Review Your Posts", while a link will direct the user to view a list of what they shared during the 10 days that the bug was active. Facebook will soon start individually informing the people who were affected by the bug.

Facebook said it had reverted the audience settings to users' prior preference. It's admitting the mistake itself, doing so promptly, and proactively notifying anyone who is affected.

Affected users will see an alert in their notifications about the error and will be able to review the posts that went public.

Facebook data - do we get what we deserve?

This particular setting is meant to be persistent - it retains whatever the most recent settings were until they are changed by the user.

  • Terrell Bush