Trump 'very close' to decision on Supreme Court pick

Both sides in the increasingly acrimonious dispute took to the Sunday political talk shows at the start of what promises to be an epic tussle over the ninth seat on the nation's highest court.

President Trump is expected to announce his nomination for the open supreme court seat on Monday.

Trump has said he'll announce his selection Monday in a prime-time event from the White House East Room at 9 p.m. On Sunday there was no indication that he had yet made his decision, as speculation continued to swirl around the appointment.

He crafted Trump's short list of potential Supreme Court nominees. A more conservative justice could move the court to the right, potentially for decades, and could potentially vote with the majority to overturn Roe v. Wade. The President interviewed seven candidates from his master-list of 25 judges, the White House said.

Leo said that it was impossible to predict the positions of any of the leading candidates for the seat on abortion.

Leo said: "Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Barrett have a lot of name recognition among supporters of the president, and I think that ultimately when people like them are nominated, you'll see a lot of folks line up". He was confirmed by the Senate 52-44.

The South Carolina senator said Democrats from red states will have a hard time opposing any of those judges.

Democratic Sen. Richard Blumenthal accused Trump of outsourcing his decision to the Federalist Society and other conservative groups. "So, it is important to have people who are extremely well known and have distinguished records".

The New York Times on Sunday reported that the Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell, was strongly urging Trump to opt for either Hardiman or Kethledge on grounds that the other two might be impossible to get confirmed.

Some conservatives have expressed concerns about Kavanaugh - a longtime judge and former clerk for Kennedy - questioning his commitment to social issues like abortion and noting his time serving under President George W. Bush as evidence he is a more establishment choice. McCaskill, a centrist Democrat who broke with her other red state colleagues by voting against Neil Gorsuch a year ago, insists that she has not already made up her mind to vote "no" against retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy's successor. In addition to wanting to preserve Roe v. Wade, he said, the public wants "protections for millions of Americans" on health care. He namechecked Leo's Federalist Society and the rightwing Heritage Foundation.

For Trump, this was his second consecutive weekend in New Jersey.

  • Rogelio Becker