Anderson defeats Isner, reaches Wimbledon final in over six-hour match

Anderson defeated eight-time Wimbledon champion Roger Federer in a 13-11 fifth set in the quarterfinals Wednesday. The final score: 7-6 (6), 6-7 (5), 6-7 (9), 6-4, 26-24.

The match was also just shorter than a Davis Cup first-round match between Argentina's Leonardo Mayer and Brazil's Joao Souza, which went on for six hours and 43 minutes in 2015r.

"Honestly, I really hope this is a bit of a sign for grand slams to change the five sets". At the end, you feel like this is a draw between the two of us, but somebody has to win.

It was the longest semi-final ever played at Wimbledon, surpassing the four hours 44 minutes it took Djokovic to beat Juan Martin del Potro in 2013.

The only Wimbledon match to last longer was Isner's win over Nicolas Mahut in 2010, which ended 70-68 in the fifth set after 11 hours and five minutes.

Wimbledon doesn't use tiebreakers in the fifth set for men, or third set for women, so there's nothing to prevent a match from going on and on and on - and that's precisely what Isner and Anderson did, often thanks to one ho-hum hold after another.

Nicole Melichar and Kveta Peschke upset sixth seeds Gabriela Dabrowski and Yifan Xu 6-3 4-6 7-5 in two hours and 16 minutes to reach the women's doubles final.

And the friendship and rivalry between the two was evident in both of their post-match interviews, with Isner quick to congratulate the South African for reaching his first Wimbledon final. They combined for 102 aces: 53 by Isner, 49 by Anderson.

With the win, Anderson will face off against the victor of Nadal-Djokovic match in the final at Wimbledon, with the hopes of winning the first major title of his career. It was the South African who played the much better game this set, returning serve extremely well and making very few unforced errors.

Isner did, however, break the record of the most serves at a tournament - beating Goran Ivanisevic's 213 on his way to the Wimbledon back in 2001.

When Anderson finally broke Isner, he halted the American's streak of 110 consecutive holds at Wimbledon.

In contrast, Anderson didn't concede a break-point in this set, taking one of the six offered by Isner under fading light.

When Isner finally slapped a tired forehand wide at 7.46pm local time, there were no wild roars, no fist pumping and no raised arms in celebration from Anderson. Two points later, Anderson had the vital break to lead 25-24 before serving out the match.

"I don't know what to say right now".

"I think it's long overdue", Isner said.

  • Stacy Allen