Apple to update iPhone software after threat of China ban

Apple to update iPhone software after threat of China ban

IT

Apple will start rolling out these updates starting next week, which would most likely address 'possible concern about their compliance with the court order.' These updates will further address the minor functionality of the two patents issued by Qualcomm in the court. In China, Qualcomm has accused Apple that their old iPhones use some software animations or features which infringe on their patents. However, Apple's newest models, the iPhone XS and XR, were not covered by the ban because they had not yet been introduced when Qualcomm filed its lawsuit late a year ago. At the same time, Apple filed a request for reconsideration with the court which invoked the preliminary injunction.

"Based on the iPhone models we offer today in China, we believe we are in compliance", Apple said in a messaged statement.

In detail, a Chinese court has ordered Apple to ban sales of some Apple iPhones which are violating the two Qualcomm patents.

The ruling from a local court - which came as Washington and Beijing are locked in sensitive trade negotiations - pivoted the battle over patent fees to the world's largest mobile arena. Qualcomm was once a key Apple supplier, providing baseband modems and more for iPhones and other devices. In a filing obtained by Bloomberg, Apple argues that a Chinese ban will force it to settle its bruising battle with Qualcomm - an outcome that may harm the country's smartphone industry by hiking licensing fees. As a result, Kuo anticipates that Apple during the first quarter of 2019 will sell anywhere from 38 to 42 million iPhones, a steep decline from his initial projection of 47-52 million units.

Apple admitted that if it can not avoid the Chinese sales ban, it will be forced to settle with Qualcomm.

Well, whatever the thing is, the new order from the court has the potential to disrupt Apple's business in China.

Chip giant Qualcomm hopes to extend the range of iPhones banned in China, the Financial Times reported Thursday, December 13.

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  • Terrell Bush