Daylight Saving Time Starts This Weekend. But Why Do We Spring Forward?

The beginning of daylight saving time means more than just losing an hour of sleep for you Sunday morning.

Daylight saving time sets in at 2 a.m. Sunday, so that means we all lose an hour of sleep while gaining an extra hour of evening sunlight as we "spring forward". You'll have to turn your clocks AHEAD one hour if you don't want to be an hour late for church on Sunday morning.

Walker said daylight-saving time (DST) is a kind of "global experiment" we perform twice a year.

Where is Daylight Saving Time not observed in the US?

Also, as you may recall, California voters passed Prop 7 in November for Permanent Daylight Saving Time.

DST was instituted during WWI but abandoned soon after only to be revived in 1942 by President Franklin Roosevelt, again in an effort to conserve resources during a world war. In 2019, Arizona, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands are the only U.S. states and territories that do not observe Daylight Saving Time.

After Indiana adopted daylight saving time statewide in 2006, researchers examined power usage statistics and found that electricity consumption there rose 1% overall, with a 2% to 4% increase in the fall months.

It's always Daylight Saving Time.

MA state Senator John Keenan is one of the advocates for permanent daylight savings.

While many people also cite the reason behind the time change as a way to help farmers with crops and harvesting, the truth is this was a myth created by the Chamber of Commerce to garner support for the concept.

Efforts to kill off daylight saving time are almost as old as the time shift itself, and even today, some are trying to get it repealed.

One would move ME into the Atlantic Time Zone, which would mean the state would no longer set clocks back in fall.

States that came around: In the past, Alaska, Michigan and In did not observe the time change.

- Those thinking of another way: ME cooked up a little workaround to federal approval: Lawmakers there passed a bill to simply move into a whole new time zone (Atlantic Standard Time) and then opt out of DST, which states can choose to do (the state Senate later added a change that stalled its taking effect).

  • Rogelio Becker